mumborneveryminute@hotmail.com


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Empowering, Guiding and Supporting
Bumps, Babies and Beyond

 

 

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Antenatal Course & Birth Preparation

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All online in the comfort of your own home. With my experience as a Midwife, Nurse, Hypnobirthing Instructor, Baby Massage Instructor and Mum of 3, these courses will guide, support and empower you. 

 

 

 
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🩸Postnatal bleeding 🩸 Time and time again I talk to ladies and they expres...
4
🩸Postnatal bleeding 🩸 Time and time again I talk to ladies and they express how they had no idea how much they would bleed after and for so long. So... here it is... Whether you have a vaginal birth or a cesarean section you still have postnatal bleeding. You are likely to bleed for anything between 4 and 6 weeks postnatally. Usually the heaviest bleeding is between day 3 and 10 after birth. It will then get lighter and eventually be a normal discharge. It starts off bright red blood and then it will gradually turn a brownish colour and decrease until it finally stops. Some women find that when they do too much they get little spurts of blood. Like running around after another child or children. This is quite normal. Hence why it’s important to rest up and when I say rest... i mean actually rest! Although labour and birth as an extremely natural process your body has still been through a heck of a lot, so gonna give it the chance to rest and heal please? If you get big clots thought it’s important to let your Midwife know. This is very important! It can smell quite different to a period but if you feel that it’s a strong, foul odor this could be a sign of infection. So again, be sure to tell your Midwife. You should NOT be soaking more than 1 pad an hour for 3 hours. 
 Try to use big pads. Ideally not a thin pad and stay away from any scented pads as this can be irritable. The well known brands are fine but ideally just go for the big huge thick pads. They just feel comfier and act like a wee protection down there. It is not a good idea to use tampons until you’ve had your 6 week check, this can increase your chance of getting an infection. You may notice the bleeding is redder and heavier when you breastfeed. This happens because breastfeeding makes your womb contract. You may also feel cramps similar to period pains. So all in all not the nicest of bleeds because it is for longer than a period but it’s the bodies way of healing. So just be kind to it and it will pass.
🩸Postnatal bleeding 🩸 Time and time again I talk to ladies and they express how they had no idea how much they would bleed after and for so long. So... here it is... Whether you have a vaginal birth or a cesarean section you still have postnatal bleeding. You are likely to bleed for anything between 4 and 6 weeks postnatally. Usually the heaviest bleeding is between day 3 and 10 after birth. It will then get lighter and eventually be a normal discharge. It starts off bright red blood and then it will gradually turn a brownish colour and decrease until it finally stops. Some women find that when they do too much they get little spurts of blood. Like running around after another child or children. This is quite normal. Hence why it’s important to rest up and when I say rest... i mean actually rest! Although labour and birth as an extremely natural process your body has still been through a heck of a lot, so gonna give it the chance to rest and heal please? If you get big clots thought it’s important to let your Midwife know. This is very important! It can smell quite different to a period but if you feel that it’s a strong, foul odor this could be a sign of infection. So again, be sure to tell your Midwife. You should NOT be soaking more than 1 pad an hour for 3 hours. 
 Try to use big pads. Ideally not a thin pad and stay away from any scented pads as this can be irritable. The well known brands are fine but ideally just go for the big huge thick pads. They just feel comfier and act like a wee protection down there. It is not a good idea to use tampons until you’ve had your 6 week check, this can increase your chance of getting an infection. You may notice the bleeding is redder and heavier when you breastfeed. This happens because breastfeeding makes your womb contract. You may also feel cramps similar to period pains. So all in all not the nicest of bleeds because it is for longer than a period but it’s the bodies way of healing. So just be kind to it and it will pass.
An epidural is a special type of local anaesthetic. It numbs the nerves tha...
3
An epidural is a special type of local anaesthetic. It numbs the nerves that carry the pain impulses from the birth canal to the brain. It shouldn't make you sick or drowsy. An anaesthetist is the only person who can give an epidural, so it won't be available at home or in a stand alone midwifery unit. If you think you might want one, check whether anaesthetists are always available at your chosen place of birth. How much you can move your legs after en epidural depends on the local anaesthetic used. Getting an epidural means that there is a requirement for the baby's heart rate to be continuously monitored (by telemetry). An epidural can provide very good pain relief, but it's not always 100% effective in labour. The Obstetric Anaesthetists Association estimates that 1 in 8 women who have an epidural during labour need to use other methods of pain relief. If you are considering on getting a epidural keep in mind that when you intervene there is more chance that further intervention may be required. I often say... intervention leads to intervention! Take it upon yourself to research your options and be informed! Thank you @mommy.labornurse for a great image to help women to be informed. 🙏🏻 . . #labour #birth #pregnancy #antenatal #antenataleducation #epidural #informed #mumtobe #maternitycare #mum #prenatal #maternity #havingababy #mumtobe #soontobemum #baby #babies #pregnancyinformation
An epidural is a special type of local anaesthetic. It numbs the nerves that carry the pain impulses from the birth canal to the brain. It shouldn't make you sick or drowsy. An anaesthetist is the only person who can give an epidural, so it won't be available at home or in a stand alone midwifery unit. If you think you might want one, check whether anaesthetists are always available at your chosen place of birth. How much you can move your legs after en epidural depends on the local anaesthetic used. Getting an epidural means that there is a requirement for the baby's heart rate to be continuously monitored (by telemetry). An epidural can provide very good pain relief, but it's not always 100% effective in labour. The Obstetric Anaesthetists Association estimates that 1 in 8 women who have an epidural during labour need to use other methods of pain relief. If you are considering on getting a epidural keep in mind that when you intervene there is more chance that further intervention may be required. I often say... intervention leads to intervention! Take it upon yourself to research your options and be informed! Thank you @mommy.labornurse for a great image to help women to be informed. 🙏🏻 . . #labour #birth #pregnancy #antenatal #antenataleducation #epidural #informed #mumtobe #maternitycare #mum #prenatal #maternity #havingababy #mumtobe #soontobemum #baby #babies #pregnancyinformation